Rick Wester Fine Art: Circles & Squares

Cassandra Zampini’s debut video DataStream, 31 Mins, 2019 will be exhibited at Rick Wester Fine Art in Chelsea, New York in the exhibition Circles & Squares.

Exhibition opens June 16, 2019

Reception with the artists June 20th, 2019.

Arnot Art Museum

#sinkbooty, 1 Sec, will be exhibited at the Arnot Art Museum;’s 76th Regional exhibition March 16th - June 14. 2019.

Opening Reception March 16th, 2019

#sinkbooty, 1 sec, Cassandra Zampini, 2018, archival pigment print, Edition of 3

#sinkbooty, 1 sec, Cassandra Zampini, 2018, archival pigment print, Edition of 3

Collector Daily

Thank you Collector Daily for the in-depth and thought provoking study of my current exhibition Data Mine at Rick Wester Fine Art in Chelsea, New York, NY. Write-up below or click here for the link.

JTF (just the facts): A total of 7 large scale black and white photographs, framed in black and unmatted, and hung against white walls in the main gallery space and the entry area. All of the works are archival pigment prints, mounted to Dibond, made in 2018. Physical sizes range from roughly 50×30 to 88×53 inches, and all of the prints come in editions of 3. (Installation and detail shots below.)

Comments/Context: One of the major consequences of the widespread digitization of photography in recent years is that our stored and shared images immediately became electronic entries in very large databases. This has made them available to the many algorithmic software tools that had been developed over the past several decades, and these programs have the power to extract relevant examples from large data sets based on search criteria, classification tags, and other pattern recognition methods. As a result of this confluence of photographic technology transformation and software availability, it suddenly became relatively easy to pull clusters of picture-based information out of the massive torrent of data flowing by.

In terms of raw numbers of photographs, Instagram is a major contributor to the buildup of these gargantuan digital image archives. According to recent data, there have been some 40 billion photos posted to the site since its launch in 2010, with some 95 million now being added each and every day by the smartphone-enabled masses. From an art-making perspective, these ever growing image data stores represent a huge new resource/opportunity for those who can figure out how to harness their immensity.

Cassandra Zampini dives into the deep end of this rippling pool of available imagery in her new series Data Mine. Her particular interest lies in the selfie, and in what patterns start to emerge when we look at large numbers of the pictures that we take of ourselves. Several of the works in the show are based on an astonishing statistic – selfies are uploaded to Instagram at a rate of roughly 750 new selfies per second. Zampini has turned that structural idea into works that gather together 2 and 3 seconds of selfies. After turning all of the sourced images black and white and harmonizing them for size, she has arrayed them in dense edge to edge grids. In these works, there is no visible sorting for obvious variables – gender, race, age, nationality, and other potential identifiers are left to arrive at random rates, mimicking the melting pot of humanity that posts to Instagram at any given moment.

From afar, many of these images are reduced to something like old school television static, with buzzing layers of black and white seeming to resolve into stripes, but then dissolving back into crackly noise. In others, Zampini has added a gradual gradient twist, starting with dark black, negative tonality images at the top, which then lighten and move to positive tonalities in the middle and then reverse the progression back to black at the bottom, almost like the slow undulation of a wave. In both cases, up close, the amazing diversity of humanity seems to be collapsed a bit, each of us looking largely like our neighbors and friends when placed in front of a mirror with our smartphones. At their core, her intricate composites find anonymous universality in large numbers of singular individuals.

Zampini’s data mining gets more sophisticated, and the resulting artworks get more intriguing, when she starts to look for commonalities in selfie posing. Three of the works on view reduce the image data set down to one second of selfies (still roughly 750 individual frames), but limits the images to specific poses – the look-at-my-muscles single arm flex, the seductive over the shoulder look while perched on the edge of the sink in the bathroom (showing off the curves of the person’s rear end AKA “sinkbooty”), and the standing pregnant woman showing off the enlarged curve of her belly (from the front or the side). Here again, these private moments where we are showing off for the camera (and by definition indirectly for others) have a remarkable sameness when compared with images draw from the broader Istagram population – we are all doing the same things with undeniable conformity, even though we think we are being clever.

It’s certainly possible to see the commonality that Zampini has arranged in these artworks as both negative and positive. Negative, in that perhaps we aren’t as special and different as we expect, our individuality just a mirage. But also positive, in that we are all connected via these same elemental human behaviors, regardless of the usual categories and labels that are typically used to divide us. My personal reaction to the endless parade of faces and bodies doing the same thing was tilted more toward the optimistic, recognizing that so many of us are following the same paths in our diverse lives. There is indeed humanity to be found in these unfathomable heaps of image data.

These works feel like they are just scratching the surface of what sophisticated data mining approaches combined with artistic thinking might produce, so there is plenty of further room to run for Zampini and this larger idea. I, for one, am supremely glad she has not tried to arrange the individual images into mosaics that resolve into one large image when seen from afar – that aesthetic trick feels bankrupt at this point, so she has done well to avoid it.

Given the cultural ubiquity of the selfie, few artists have really figured out how to tap into its truths, particularly with respect to how social behaviors and aspirations are embedded in its inherent processes of self examination and identity construction. Zampini’s works are encouraging first steps, testing some of the limits of scale and legibility. She’s found an exciting vein for ongoing artistic exploration, so we should watch carefully where she takes us next.

Collector’s POV: The works in this show are priced at $5000, $10000, or $12000, based on size. Zampini’s work has little secondary market history at this point, so gallery retail likely remains the best option for those collectors interested in following up.

L'Oeil De La Photographie

https://loeildelaphotographie.com/en/event/cassandra-zampini-data-mine/

Photography Exhibition Cassandra Zampini, Data Mine

September 13, 2018 to October 20, 2018

Opening September 13th, 6-8pm.

Rick Wester Fine Art is pleased to present the debut exhibition of Data Mine, an ongoing project by the photographer Cassandra Zampini that speaks to the complex contemporary tapestry that weaves and warps the personal obsessions of self-expression, self-identity and self-discovery through the use of the “selfie” in social media.

In her first New York exhibition, Ms. Zampini is exhibiting seven large scale composite portraits comprised of thousands of images downloaded from Instagram, chosen from over the 2.5 million images she has so far collected. Carefully chosen and organized, the images are arranged by pose, processed to be monochromatic and then deliberately arranged in patterns that create a tonal range from near complete opaqueness to negative form, then transforming to positive images and back again.

For more information: www.rickwesterfineart.com/exhibitions-archive/2018/8/24/data-mine

Rick Wester Fine Art

526 West 26th Street, Suite 417 New York, NY 10001 USA

September 13, 2018 to October 20, 2018

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CASSANDRA ZAMPINI: DATA MINE SOLO EXHIBITION at Rick Wester Fine Art

DATA MINE

CASSANDRA ZAMPINI

September 13 - October 20, 2018

Opening reception: September 13, 6 - 8 p.m.

A knowledge of photography is just as important as that of the alphabet. The illiterates of the future will be ignorant of the use of camera and pen alike. 

-Laszlo Moholy-Nagy in 1936, as quoted in Moholy-Nagy: Future Present

The sheer scale of this data has far exceeded human sense-making capabilities. At these scales, patterns are often too subtle and relationships too complex or multi-dimensional to observe by simply looking at the data. Data mining is a means of automating part of this process to detect interpretable patterns; it helps us see the forest without getting lost in the trees.

-Alexander Furnas, “Everything You Wanted to Know about Data Mining but Were Afraid to Ask”, The Atlantic. April 3, 2012

Rick Wester Fine Art is pleased to present the debut exhibition of Data Mine, an ongoing project by the photographer Cassandra Zampini that speaks to the complex contemporary tapestry that weaves and warps the personal obsessions of self-expression, self-identity and self-discovery through the use of the “selfie” in social media. In her first New York exhibition, Ms. Zampini is exhibiting seven large scale composite portraits comprised of thousands of images downloaded from Instagram, chosen from over the 2.5 million images she has so far collected. Carefully chosen and organized, the images are arranged by pose, processed to be monochromatic and then deliberately arranged in patterns that create a tonal range from near complete opaqueness to negative form, then transforming to positive images and back again. The titles are hashtags Ms. Zampini applies to describe the poses, followed by the amount of time it took to upload the images at a rate of approximately 750 new selfies per second. The vertical works are created in one size only ranging from 50 x 30 inches to nearly 90 x 50 inches. They are released in editions of only three examples each.

Instagram has done more for people to communicate through photography than any other media since the invention of the picture press and the massive popularity of photographically illustrated magazines from the early 20thcentury through the Post-War era, the prime difference being that it is interactive, responsive and free of charge. The simple vastness of the amount of imagery Zampini has mined is staggering but the information gleaned from the pictures is far more significant and wide ranging. Zampini’s conclusions include the revelation that despite the complete freedom allowed the sitter/photographer, people tend to mimic existing poses in environments already familiar to them, no matter their geographic location or background. In an era dominated by the omnipresence of Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms, there is an urgent need for artists to explore the ramifications of such a phenomenon on our understanding of our culture and the world. Poignantly, Zampini’s categorizations of poses allows for a democratic distribution of race, gender, sexual identity and any other identifier for presenting oneself to the world, suggesting a thesis stressing a uniformity in humanity rather than one accentuating our differences. With the interconnectedness of the internet, and its ability to cross-reference and unite the world’s population, Zampini has managed to create The Family of Man for Millennials, drawing upon a global source of imagery that Edward Steichen would have never been able to fathom.

Moholy’s quote, dated 1936, came at a time when Fascism in Europe had been established and was further on the rise with limits on freedom of the press – and expression – accompanied by misinformation, inflammatory xenophobic statements and eventually, the wholesale dismissal of the rights of individuals. In this era, social media offers the public a medium for direct and peer to peer communication. The Selfie, with its universal appeal as a claim of individuality, democratizes the internet further and as Moholy would certainly revel in, gets to the essence of photography as language. Anyone, anywhere, understands this idiom now. There is nothing elitist left in self display.

Art Scene: DATA MINE at Rick Wester Fine Art

CASSANDRA ZAMPINI: DATA MINE AT RICK WESTER FINE ART

10/13/2018Art Scene

“Several of the works feature a gradient technique beginning in blackness, emerging into selfie grids, and fading out into blackness. The aesthetic is meant to echo the infinite scrolling that takes place on social media. It also offers the eye of the viewer a sense of rest and suggests the ultimate ephemerality of data. Zampini’s work speaks to the continued relevance of the human touch in the face of technological advancement; offering a glimpse of perspective, a touch of grace and a reminder of the beauty that can be found in art…” Read More

https://duggal.com/cassandra-zampini-data-mine-at-rick-wester-fine-art/

Aesthetica Magazine: TOAF Stylistic Developments

http://www.aestheticamagazine.com/toaf-stylistic-developments/

The Other Art Fair, New York, provides a platform for emerging artists from around the world. Celebrating new talent across a range of media, this year’s edition brought together image-makers interested in the intricacies of the contemporary experience. Practitioners offered fresh perspectives on the documentary genre, combining lens-based media and time-honoured techniques to reflect the ever-changing culture of expression.  The featured artist for this year’s edition was New York based illustrator Amber Vittoria, whose brightly-coloured images celebrate the diversity of the female form. The practitioner created live drawings throughout the event, capturing attendees using a signature style. Another practitioner playing with tone is Kristin Hart, whose images bridge the boundaries between painting and photography. To capture the sublimity in nature, Hart adds soft pastel washes in postproduction, creating a serene yet otherworldly atmosphere.  In a similar way to Vittoria, fine art photographer Cassandra Zampini, whose work is featured above, records life in urban environments. Combining innovative viewpoints with a focus on light and shadow, the monochromatic compositions track the interactions between individuals their changing surroundings. As the artist notes: “The city is a choreography of constant transition and the way we live and interact in society is changing faster than ever. I use the geometry of the city to frame the landscape of the American mind and reveal the humanity beneath our every day.”  Interested in contemporary culture, George Underwood whose contemplative observations capture fleeting moments. By combining landscapes, documentary and self-portraiture, the artist reflects on the breadth of human experience, finding the beauty in the mundane whilst celebrating major milestones. For example, the  Freedom  series investigates ideas of the American Dream, investigating notions of pride in relation to the country’s iconic landscape.  Find out more   here.     Credits:   1. Cassandra Zampini,  No Smoking Near Door.    Posted on 2 May 2018

The Other Art Fair, New York, provides a platform for emerging artists from around the world. Celebrating new talent across a range of media, this year’s edition brought together image-makers interested in the intricacies of the contemporary experience. Practitioners offered fresh perspectives on the documentary genre, combining lens-based media and time-honoured techniques to reflect the ever-changing culture of expression.

The featured artist for this year’s edition was New York based illustrator Amber Vittoria, whose brightly-coloured images celebrate the diversity of the female form. The practitioner created live drawings throughout the event, capturing attendees using a signature style. Another practitioner playing with tone is Kristin Hart, whose images bridge the boundaries between painting and photography. To capture the sublimity in nature, Hart adds soft pastel washes in postproduction, creating a serene yet otherworldly atmosphere.

In a similar way to Vittoria, fine art photographer Cassandra Zampini, whose work is featured above, records life in urban environments. Combining innovative viewpoints with a focus on light and shadow, the monochromatic compositions track the interactions between individuals their changing surroundings. As the artist notes: “The city is a choreography of constant transition and the way we live and interact in society is changing faster than ever. I use the geometry of the city to frame the landscape of the American mind and reveal the humanity beneath our every day.”

Interested in contemporary culture, George Underwood whose contemplative observations capture fleeting moments. By combining landscapes, documentary and self-portraiture, the artist reflects on the breadth of human experience, finding the beauty in the mundane whilst celebrating major milestones. For example, the Freedom series investigates ideas of the American Dream, investigating notions of pride in relation to the country’s iconic landscape.

Find out more here.

Credits:
1. Cassandra Zampini, No Smoking Near Door.

Posted on 2 May 2018

Interview Feature: Meet Cassandra Zampini

Interview with Boston Voyager 

http://bostonvoyager.com/interview/meet-cassandra-zampini/

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Today we’d like to introduce you to Cassandra Zampini.

Every artist has a unique story. Can you briefly walk us through yours?

http://bostonvoyager.com/interview/meet-cassandra-zampini/

 

SMFA Tufts Art Sale

Please to invite you to the annual SMFA Art Sale! My photographs among many other works available to benefit the SMFA School. Hope to see you there! 

For more information go to:  https://smfa.tufts.edu/events-exhibits/calendar/smfa-art-sale

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It's time for the SMFA Art Sale. And you can get in first. Come check out this super cool, VIP, pre-public opportunity to purchase an awesome array of exciting new artworks. And, you'll be supporting the arts and student scholarships. So, you'll be there, right?

Please join me November 14-16, at 230 The Fenway in Boston. We will welcome guests at the side entrance (just to the left of the Atrium, closer to Museum Road) for check-in.

Review in ArtFuse

Great article in ArtFuse on the exhibition Galerie Protégé: 

"Every art season, it is a safari out there and only the biggest art stars get the lion’s share of the spotlight. This year ARTE FUSE and Galerie Protégé partnered up on an expedition to find the emerging talent in contemporary art, which they naturally selected to fifteen to be in the season opener of the gallery. Both the publication and the gallery had the curated ideals of featuring artists that need attention and exposure. Curator Alison Pierz came in as the third person to join in selecting work for the juried exhibition and open call. More than 300 submissions came in and it took some eagle eye focus to drill down plus the help of an app that scores then tabulates their choices – the final fifteen were naturally selected

Full article here: https://artefuse.com/2017/09/14/natural-selection-at-galerie-protege-125169/

Exhibition goes until October 3rd. 

Galerie Protégé, (W22 & 9th) Chelsea, New York. 

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Chelsea, New York: Galerie Protégé

http://www.galerieprotege.com

Natural Selection

2017 Juried Exhibition by Galerie Protégé, Arte Fuse and Alison Pierz

September 7 – October 3, 2017

Opening night September 7th 6-8 pm.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New York… Galerie Protégé and Arte Fuse contemporary art blog share a common goal of supporting emerging and established artists, so we decided to partner up through a juried open call to search for underappreciated talent that deserves more attention and exposure. We also invited an additional juror, Alison Pierz, who is an independent curator and previous gallery owner, to assist with the selection of artists for the show and to give them exposure to another curator. After carefully reviewing all the interesting submissions, we finally decided on 15 artists for the group show “Natural Selection” which will open at Galerie Protégé on September 7th from 6-8pm and will run until October 3rd, 2017. Additional to the group show, we selected one artist for an interview and studio visit with Arte Fuse about their work. The winner for the interview and studio visit is Jacob Hicks from NYC. Arte Fuse will also write an article about the group show “Natural Selection” to help promote the show, the artists and the work selected.

 

Participating artists: Jacob Hicks, Alfonso Oliva, Rodolfo Edwards, Senem Oezdogan, Sofia Echa, Ronald Gonzalez, Lindsay Fackrell, Day + Waldman, Cassandra Zampini, Maia Radanovic, Kjeld Tidemand, Krista Svalbonas, Sarabeth Domal, Snow Yunxue Fu and Eleni Giannopoulou.

 

Galerie Protége

197 9th Avenue, NY, NY 10011

Hours Monday – Saturday 10-6pm

 

Founded in September 2011, Galerie Protégé is an exhibition space located in the heart of New York City’s Chelsea gallery district reserved exclusively for emerging artists. Located on the lower level of Chelsea Frames, Galerie Protégé is dedicated to hosting exhibitions of contemporary art in a variety of media including painting, drawing, photography, installation, and performance-based work.

 

ARTE FUSE is a contemporary online art blog featuring news; openings; events; galleries; studio visits and art reviews. Our main focus is to examine current art shows to give our readers a curated perspective on the art scene with a special focus on New York. The blog was founded by Jamie Martinez, our Publisher, and CEO in 2008.

 

Alison Pierz is an independent art curator working in New York City.  She has and MA in Art Market: Principles and Practices from the Fashion Institute of Technology and a BFA from Pratt Institute. She has worked for the past several years in fine art management and curation

SAATCHI: The Other Art Fair New York

Pleased to announce I will be participating in SAATCHI's The Other Art Fair New York June 1 - June 4, 2017.

 http://nyc.theotherartfair.com

Following sixteen successful installments across the UK and Australia, The Other Art Fair makes it's debut in the creative heart of New York City on June 1-4 2017, presenting 130 talented emerging artists to an audience of art buyers and ethusiasts. Each artist has been handpicked by a Selection Committee of art experts, so visitors can add to their collection with the confidence that they are buying from the very best and most promising emerging artists.